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St. Marks Elm trees - petition of doleance a step closer
Our advocates Keystone Law have written to the planning applicant and the department indicating that the charity is intending to file a doleance claim for an Isle of Man court to review the decision to grant the planning permission that would remove the St Marks’ Elms.  
We are invititing them to agree a stay to the progression of the claim to allow time and space for the department and planning applicant to attempt to resolve matters between themselves and outside of the court.

St. Marks Elm trees - petition of doleance a step closer

Our advocates Keystone Law have written to the planning applicant and the department indicating that the charity is intending to file a doleance claim for an Isle of Man court to review the decision to grant the planning permission that would remove the St Marks’ Elms.

We are invititing them to agree a stay to the progression of the claim to allow time and space for the department and planning applicant to attempt to resolve matters between themselves and outside of the court.
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Timeline PhotosLARGEST TREE IN THE WORLD
Location : Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park in Tulare County, California, USA.
The General Sherman Tree is the world's largest tree, measured by volume. It stands 275 feet (83 m) tall, and is over 36 feet (11 m) in diameter at the base. Sequoia trunks remain wide high up. Sixty feet above the base, the Sherman Tree is 17.5 feet (5.3 m) in diameter.

It is estimated to be around 2,300 to 2,700 years old.
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That is some tree. Are there any sequoia trees on the IOM?

We've seen it and many more too.

Tomorrow, Sunday, 22nd of August, from 10.30 am we are going to be Bracken thrasing on the Sulby Glen site. The 1260 trees planted there would appreciate more light. We would be delighted if you join us - volunteers wanted!
The site is steeply sloped and there is a small stream to cross first to get to it. This session is unsuitable for bringing pets or children.
Bracken thrashing involves trampling/whipping down the bracken so that the trees get enough light, quite fun with constructive destruction.
All you need to bring are sturdy shoes and a suitable stick/thrashing weapon would be helpful. We will try to remember bringing a few extras just in case. 
While bracken thrashing disrupts wildlife habitat in the short term, it is vital as our newly planted trees need light to prosper. Broadleaf woodland is a much more valuable habitat for wildlife.
The site along the Sulby Glen Road is the firest field north of the Tholt-y-will plantation on the left side of the road. Parking is available along the road, please park on the opposite site of the road or down the little slip road. A map is attached.
If you need a lift from Douglas let us know by posting underneath.
If you feel ill or prefer to stay self isolated, please stay at home. Health comes first.Image attachment

Tomorrow, Sunday, 22nd of August, from 10.30 am we are going to be Bracken thrasing on the Sulby Glen site. The 1260 trees planted there would appreciate more light. We would be delighted if you join us - volunteers wanted!

The site is steeply sloped and there is a small stream to cross first to get to it. This session is unsuitable for bringing pets or children.

Bracken thrashing involves trampling/whipping down the bracken so that the trees get enough light, quite fun with constructive destruction.

All you need to bring are sturdy shoes and a suitable stick/thrashing weapon would be helpful. We will try to remember bringing a few extras just in case.

While bracken thrashing disrupts wildlife habitat in the short term, it is vital as our newly planted trees need light to prosper. Broadleaf woodland is a much more valuable habitat for wildlife.

The site along the Sulby Glen Road is the firest field north of the Tholt-y-will plantation on the left side of the road. Parking is available along the road, please park on the opposite site of the road or down the little slip road. A map is attached.
If you need a lift from Douglas let us know by posting underneath.

If you feel ill or prefer to stay self isolated, please stay at home. Health comes first.
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Comment on Facebook

Thank you for your help everyone! It was lovely to see the rapid progress with so many people.

It was really good to be out in wildlife 🌱 thank you for having me!

Great day for bracken bashing and met some lizards too!

Would it make sense to delay a month until the bracken is dying back? πŸ€”

Watch out for ticks!!!

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AGM date: Friday 3rd of September from 6pm @Ambulance HQ behind Nobles hospital πŸ‘¨β€πŸ«
If you like an agenda pack a couple of days before the meeting, please let us know per email.

AGM date: Friday 3rd of September from 6pm @Ambulance HQ behind Nobles hospital πŸ‘¨β€πŸ«

If you like an agenda pack a couple of days before the meeting, please let us know per email.
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Dearest lovely tree friends,
Were in the process of arranging our Annual General Meeting and in preparation, Ive been sending out some membership renewal reminders by email.  I know that its been a while since Ive been in touch but to be honest, it felt a little tone deaf to be chasing kindly folk for money during a pandemic.  
I know that were not out of the woods yet (pun intended, obviously) but I need to make sure were up to date before the meeting as only fully paid up members are able to vote on matters raised at the AGM.  Its true, its in the rules!  ;)
If you have any questions about your membership, or if I can be of assistance with anything at all - please dont hesitate to get in touch.  My email address is iomwtmembers@gmail.com.
Wishing you a wonderful Wednesday!
Clara :) x

Dearest lovely tree friends,

We're in the process of arranging our Annual General Meeting and in preparation, I've been sending out some membership renewal reminders by email. I know that it's been a while since I've been in touch but to be honest, it felt a little 'tone deaf' to be chasing kindly folk for money during a pandemic.

I know that we're not out of the woods yet (pun intended, obviously) but I need to make sure we're up to date before the meeting as only fully paid up members are able to vote on matters raised at the AGM. It's true, it's in the rules! πŸ˜‰

If you have any questions about your membership, or if I can be of assistance with anything at all - please don't hesitate to get in touch. My email address is iomwtmembers@gmail.com.

Wishing you a wonderful Wednesday!

Clara πŸ™‚ x
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Mobile UploadsTrees - even a young child knows what a Tree is, however there is surprisingly no universally recognised precise definition of what a tree is, either botanically or in common language. In its broadest sense, a tree is any plant with the general form of an elongated stem, or trunk. For Wildlife and our own lives Trees provide shelter, a home and food. Trees also have the ability to capture carbon better than any current man-made technology and of course they produce Oxygen! Planting a Tree is one of the most positive actions we can do 🌱🌿

A mature leafy tree produces as much oxygen in a season as 10 people inhale in a year. A 100-foot tree, 18 inches diameter at its base, produces 6,000 pounds of oxygen. On average, one tree produces nearly 260 pounds of oxygen each year.
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Do fruit trees, for example apple, pear, plum take in similar amounts of carbon dioxide as similar sized non fruit trees, eg. oak, beach, birch etc.? I know bees and other insects like the pollen they produce. I was thinking they would take in more CO2 to help produce the fruits and how nice would it be to plant fruit tress along side footpaths so in 5 years, ramblers would have fruit to pick as they walked.

The hills mourn their lost trees. They want them back.

Centenary Park poppies - and other flowers around the trees dedicated to the service of Manx men and women in WW1Image attachmentImage attachment

Centenary Park poppies - and other flowers around the trees dedicated to the service of Manx men and women in WW1 ... See MoreSee Less

St Marks Elms – The IOMWT shares the view of the Manx Wildlife Trust, Chris Packham and many nature loving islanders. Cutting down those mature native trees to provide another drive way is not acceptable. The proposed offset planting would take many years to provide the same benefits to the environment. πŸžπŸ›πŸ¦πŸ
Here are some potential solutions which should be considered: 
Lowering the speed limit along the road (currently 50mph) to 30 mph would increase reaction times, decrease brake distances and reduce impacts if a collision would occur. 
Widening the existing track to the farm and residential property would not only benefit the farm (as the proposal does) but also the residential property next door. The application mentions that there is a culvert to one side and the land on the other side belongs to the neighbouring property but surely the culvert could be redirected with an overall smaller tree loss. Neighbours should work together in the interesting of the public and environment!
The access could be created to a different part of the highway network where trees arent present (albeit the farm might have to buy that land).
Lastly, while it is understandable why the farm and residential property need a high visibility splay access, the storage yard opening would be much less used and could just continue in its current form, resulting in a smaller number of felled trees. At times when the storage yard opening needs to be used, a temporary solution like a crossing helper could ensure a safe crossing.

St Marks Elms – The IOMWT shares the view of the Manx Wildlife Trust, Chris Packham and many nature loving islanders. Cutting down those mature native trees to provide another drive way is not acceptable. The proposed offset planting would take many years to provide the same benefits to the environment. πŸžπŸ›πŸ¦πŸ

Here are some potential solutions which should be considered:

Lowering the speed limit along the road (currently 50mph) to 30 mph would increase reaction times, decrease brake distances and reduce impacts if a collision would occur.

Widening the existing track to the farm and residential property would not only benefit the farm (as the proposal does) but also the residential property next door. The application mentions that there is a culvert to one side and the land on the other side belongs to the neighbouring property but surely the culvert could be redirected with an overall smaller tree loss. Neighbours should work together in the interesting of the public and environment!

The access could be created to a different part of the highway network where trees aren't present (albeit the farm might have to buy that land).

Lastly, while it is understandable why the farm and residential property need a high visibility splay access, the storage yard opening would be much less used and could just continue in its current form, resulting in a smaller number of felled trees. At times when the storage yard opening needs to be used, a temporary solution like a crossing helper could ensure a safe crossing.
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Comment on Facebook

So no great big combine harvester to get around the drive

There is a peaceful family protest taking face on Sunday at 12.30 until 1.30 at St Mark's. Details at the above group.

It's a straight road and no visibility issues, there is not even a need for less than fifty mph. It's all spin and nonsense.

Why doesn't the farm use the 2nd access point to the rear that opens onto a quoter road with no trees?? 'Cos of vanity having a grand entrance??

And if you dont like it move on....there is a reason the Isle is man is so beautiful

Ian Costain commented on another Facebook post: Why, for instance, doesn't the landowner install mirrors to improve his junction visibility, or engage with the DoI about traffic calming? We're being told that the original application involved destroying twice as many trees - surely a most cavalier approach to the Manx landscape and its declining biodiversity. As for the nonsense of compensation planting - whips that will take a hundred years to develop, enhance the landscape, provide habitat, make any useful carbon-capture contribution - words fail at the level of naivety or cynicism.

Important to note its not actually a working farm anymore.

Lamara Craine do you know about this?

Time is now decided12.30-1.30 at StMarks not on the road at the trees , details on link: www.facebook.com/groups/500218021058473/permalink/500761574337451/

Here unless someone can say otherwise is the 'back' entrance to the farm which if made up doesn't need any trees felling , so why isn't this being used? Probably it wouldn't make a 'look at me,,' vanity entrance off the 'main' road...

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